Spicy Oven-Baked Fish and Sweet Potato Chips

Spicy Oven-Baked Fish and Sweet Potato Chips

Lyn got to choose 2 of her meals that are not from her strict diet this week, she reached her half way goal and that is what they do for you at that point. Let you taste real food as she calls it. Heck, it is working, every week she losses a pound or more and that is the good way it stays off. Now I like her just the way she is but get a Yes Dear look if I say something. Anyway she chose Pan Seared Sea Scallops but whole foods also had Haddock on sale and while surfing the net she found this recipe. As I am not that adventurous when it comes to fish, Haddock should be fish and chips, swordfish and tuna steaks should be grilled, salmon well there are a lot of ways that my palate  has been introduced to  so when she showed me this recipe I said why not give it a try on Sunday. It was our pregame meal which turned out to be disappointing, the game not the meal this was light, flaky and just right.

Spicy Oven-Baked Fish and Sweet Potato Chips

From BHG.com

Makes: 4 servings

Prep 20 minutes Bake 425° 20 minutes to 25 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound fresh or frozen white fish fillets, about 1/2-inch thick
  • nonstick cooking spray
  • 1 pound sweet potatoes, cut into ¼ to ½ inch sticks
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon Old Bay seasoning or seafood seasoning
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/3 cup milk
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup fine dry bread crumbs
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • Lemon wedges and fresh parsley (optional)
  • We added homemade Tatar sauce

How:

  1. Cut fish into 3 x 2-inch pieces. Rinse fish; pat dry with paper towels. Cover and chill until needed.
  2. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Line a large baking sheet with foil; lightly coat with nonstick cooking spray; set aside.
  3. For chips, pat potatoes dry with paper towels; place sweet potatoes in a large bowl. Add olive oil, Old Bay seasoning, 1/2 tsp. chili powder and 1/2 tsp. salt. Toss to coat. Arrange potatoes in a single layer on one half of the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile, for fish, place milk in a shallow dish. Place flour in another shallow dish. In a third shallow dish combine bread crumbs, 2 tsp. chili powder, paprika, 1/4 tsp. each salt and pepper. Add melted butter; stir until combined.
  5. Dip fish pieces in milk; coat with flour. Dip again in the milk, then in the bread crumb mixture. Remove baking sheet from oven. Using a spatula, carefully turn potatoes over. Place fish on the other half of the hot baking sheet; return to oven. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes more or until potatoes are golden brown and fish flakes easily with a fork. Serve fish with lemon wedges and fresh parsley, if desired.
Cut fish, prepare milk flour and bread crumbs

Cut fish, prepare milk flour and bread crumbs. Place the sweet potato fries in oven on 1/2 cookie sheet.

ready to cook 2

Dip in Milk, Flour back to Flour and then coat with bread crumbs

add the fish

Add the fish to the other half of cookie sheet and return to oven.

done

20-25 minutes until fries are golden brown and fish flakes with fork

Spicy Oven-Baked Fish and Sweet Potato Chips

Serve it up

Other recipes from stevesacooking.com you might find interesting

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Dijon Myer Lemon Glazed Wild Salmon

Almond-Crusted Salmon

Grilled Salmon with Herb Crust

Big Fat Cod potato pancakes

Crispy Potato Latkes

Crispy Potato Latkes

Hey it’s the season and PK got me going, she asked if we still celebrated Xmaschunak or something like that. My answer not really.  Since Mikie has grown up and out of the house we have kind of slipped away from Jewish traditions.  Now Lyn’s eyes light up Xmas, Hanukkah, Birthday, Easter ………. I was not the religious one in my family but there were some things I loved and still do.  Patti asked don’t you miss latkes? I do, but I can’t or should not or don’t eat like I used to, I’m sort of a good boy now, do you have a good recipe, she had peaked my interest! She replied Baked!! She is working on one for me. Then today I got an email from America Test Kitchen and the second one down Crispy Potato Latkes. Does PK have that much influence?

Latkes: Every now and then I will cheat and these would be something nice to do it with. I used to love tator tots and while growing up, these to me was like giant squished tator tots.

Published November 1, 2012. From Cook’s Illustrated.

How to Video here

Latkes come in all shapes and sizes. But the goal is always the same: lightness throughout, with a creamy interior encased in a crisp shell. To re-create this traditional Hanukkah dish, we selected high-starch russet potatoes and discovered a simple technique that yielded perfect texture, both inside and out.

Why this recipe works:

We wanted latkes that were light and not greasy, with buttery soft interiors surrounded by a shatteringly crisp outer shell. To achieve all of these goals, we needed to remove as much water as possible from the potato shreds by wringing them out in a kitchen towel and to minimize the release of what remained by microwaving the shreds briefly to cause the starches in the potatoes to form a gel. With the water taken care of, the latkes crisped up quickly and absorbed minimal oil.

Serves 4 to 6 as a side dish

We prefer shredding the potatoes on the large holes of a box grater, but you can also use the large shredding disk of a food processor; cut the potatoes into 2-inch lengths first so you are left with short shreds. Serve with applesauce and sour cream.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds russet potatoes, unpeeled, scrubbed, and shredded
  • 1/2 cup grated onion
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 2 teaspoons minced fresh parsley
  • Vegetable oil

Instructions

  1. Adjust oven rack to middle position, place rimmed baking sheet on rack, and heat oven to 200 degrees. Toss potatoes, onion, and 1 teaspoon salt in bowl. Place half of potato mixture in center of dish towel. Gather ends together and twist tightly to drain as much liquid as possible, reserving liquid in liquid measuring cup. Transfer drained potato mixture to second bowl and repeat process with remaining potato mixture. Set potato liquid aside and let stand so starch settles to bottom, at least 5 minutes.
  2. Cover potato mixture and microwave until just warmed through but not hot, 1 to 2 minutes, stirring mixture with fork every 30 seconds. Spread potato mixture evenly over second rimmed baking sheet and let cool for 10 minutes. Don’t wash out bowl.
  3. Pour off water from reserved potato liquid, leaving potato starch in measuring cup. Add eggs and stir until smooth. Return cooled potato mixture to bowl. Add parsley, 1/4 teaspoon pepper, and potato starch mixture and toss until evenly combined.
  4. Set wire rack in clean rimmed baking sheet and line with triple layer of paper towels. Heat 1/4-inch depth of oil in 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering but not smoking (350 degrees). Place 1/4-cup mound of potato mixture in oil and press with nonstick spatula into 1/3-inch-thick disk. Repeat until 5 latkes are in pan. Cook, adjusting heat so fat bubbles around latke edges, until golden brown on bottom, about 3 minutes. Turn and continue cooking until golden brown on second side, about 3 minutes longer. Drain on paper towels and transfer to baking sheet in oven. Repeat with remaining potato mixture, adding oil to maintain 1/4-inch depth and returning oil to 350 degrees between batches. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and serve immediately.
  5. TO MAKE AHEAD: Cooled latkes can be covered loosely with plastic wrap and held at room temperature for up to 4 hours. Alternatively, they can be frozen on baking sheet until firm, transferred to zipper-lock bag, and frozen for up to 1 month. Reheat latkes in 375-degree oven until crisp and hot, 3 minutes per side for room-temperature latkes and 6 minutes per side for frozen latkes.
One thing to do with butternut squash when on sale

One thing to do with butternut squash when on sale

One of my fall favorites, Butternut Squash and Apple Soup then there is plain roasted, fries, replace sweet potato, mashed with a little butter and brown sugar, the list goes on. So when I saw that sale sign and a huge basket of butternut and acorn squash it was another case of my eyes were bigger than my menu. I had some room in the freezer so I did not panic just a quick blanch and freeze.

Mature winter squashes like the butternut have tough skin that protects their firm, yellow-orange flesh and allows them to last longer than their fleeting summer squash relatives. A butternut is so self-reliant that it doesn’t even need to be refrigerated, and can be stored in a cool dark place for several weeks. So how do you choose a good one? First, pick it up. It should be heavy for its size. Look it over and make sure its skin is firm and free of bruises. Check for brown frostbite scars, which can affect the squash’s texture and longevity, and punctures or cuts, which can let bacteria in and cause mold. I like to choose one with a longer neck, especially if I am cubing make life easier. www.cookthink.com

Ingredients

Butternut squash (Quantity depends on you)

 

How

Cut ends on and peel and scrap seeds out

Cut the squash into 1/2-inch cubes.

In a larger pot bring at least 8 cups of water to a full boil

 

Blanch the squash for about 3 minutes

Strain the squash in collider and then immediately put in large bowl of ice water to stop cooking

Place on a large cookie sheet and into the freezer until frozen about 30 minutes to an hour.

Place in freezer bag (we use Food Saver), suck it and back into the freezer.

Butternut squash is an edible member of the gourd family whose roots have been traced back to Mexico in 5500 B.C. (Along with beans and corn, squash is one of the “Three Sisters,” the cornerstones of Native American cuisine.)

A mature winter squash, it grows on a vine, and has a giant pear-shaped body, tough skin, rich-tasting, vivid yellow-orange flesh and a sweet flavor. (It can often substitute well for the sweet potato.) Butternut squash can be baked, steamed, puréed or simmered, and is often referred to by cooks as a “workhorse” because of its versatility. Once cooked, its dry flesh has a glossy and silky texture that makes it a favorite in soups, curries and other dishes. http://www.cookthink.com

 

The word “squash” comes from the Narragansett word that means “to eat raw or green.” You certainly won’t be eating your squash raw or green, and you must cook it even before you freeze it to make sure that the squash retains its color and texture once it is thawed. The process of cooking squash is called blanching. When you blanch squash, you boil it just long enough to stop the enzymes that cause squash to deteriorate. The process for preparing and blanching squash for freezing depends on whether you are freezing summer or winter squash. http://www.livestrong.com

Pig Skins

Pig Skins

You can assemble these game day pig skins ahead of time, if you like. For daintier eaters try pop in your mouth bite-size pig skins, make this recipe with 12 small potatoes instead. Or for a twist, substitute smoked turkey or chicken for the pork, heck make them all and pig out.

 Ingredients:

  • 6 medium Yukon gold potatoes (about 2 1/2 lbs.)
  • 1 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • A couple of green onions slice thin for garnish
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1 cup BBQ sauce (I used my Root beer BBQ sauce but you can use your own)
  • 3/4 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 cup salsa
  • 1 cup grated Monterey Jack
  • 1 1/2 cup shredded pulled pork (You can buy in store or make your own)

How:

Preheat oven to 400°F. Prick potatoes all over with a fork then arrange on a baking sheet and bake until tender, 45 to 50 minutes. Set aside until cool enough to handle, then cut in half lengthwise and scoop out flesh, leaving only about 1/4 inch of potato all around. (Save potato flesh for another use.)

In the meantime, heat oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Add onions, salt and pepper and cook, stirring often, until golden brown, about 10-15 minutes. Reduce heat to medium and cook until deep golden brown, 6 to 8 minutes more.

Preheat broiler. Divide half of the cheese among potato skins, then top with onions. Arrange pork on onions then top with remaining cheese. Broil until golden brown and bubbly, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer potato skins to a platter and serve with BBQ sauce, sour cream, salsa on the side and what else BEER!

Go Pats!

Where did potato skins originate?

According to Yahoo Answers

Sorry to tell you, but they originated with TGI Fridays. But don’t worry, it wasn’t the original store in NYC. They were actually concocted by a hungry sous chef in the Atlanta store. The year was 1974.

I still think that Friday’s skins are the best. I was introduced to them in Cupertino, California around 1977, and every Friday night would go to the bar there for skins and beer (extra sour cream, please!). Got fatter than heck that summer.

Now that’s what Fridays would like you to believe is it true? Let’s hear from you?

Salt and Vinegar Broiled Fingerling Potatoes

Salt and Vinegar Broiled Fingerling Potatoes

Salt and Vinegar Broiled Fingerling Potatoes from Umami Girl

Lyn and I are on a Salt and Vinegar baked potato chip kick (Kettle Chips Baked)  so much so that we order directly a case at a time, individual size, my god a big bag would be too much we have no self-control once the bag is open. When I saw Umami Girl’s “Salt and Vinegar Broiled Fingerling Potatoes” on Pinterest I just had to try I like a good oven fried potatoes.

I made no changes but will try with malt vinegar.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound fingerling potatoes, sliced lengthwise to 1/4-inch thickness*
  • 2 cups white or malt vinegar
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Kosher Salt
  • Pepper

How:

1. In a small pot, combine the potato slices and vinegar. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer until fork-tender, about 8 minutes. Let cool in liquid for 30 minutes. Then drain well and pat potatoes dry with paper towels.

2. Preheat the broiler with a rack about 6 inches below the heat source. Dump the potato slices onto a sheet pan, sprinkle very generously with olive oil, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Arrange the potato slices in a single layer. Broil until lightly browned on top, about 7 minutes. Then flip the slices and broil until the underside is lightly browned, about 5 minutes more. Serve warm.

Roasted Potato Salad with Cilantro and Balsamic Vinaigrette

Roasted Potato Salad with Cilantro and Balsamic Vinaigrette

Mother’s day we decided to try new things this was one from Williams-Sonoma Kitchen. As mentioned I did not have the watercress so substituted fresh cilantro and fresh ground pepper. I can see that watercress would add a noteworthy for a peppery, tangy flavor and be very nice but one works with what they have.

For a light lunch, toss this salad with chunks of grilled tuna, sliced Kalamata olives and roasted red bell peppers. Or sprinkle with toasted walnuts, dried cranberries and crumbled goat cheese, and serve as a first course to a winter meal.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lb. small fingerlings, Yukon Gold or new potatoes, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 Tbs. olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp. chopped fresh thyme
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 3 Tbs. balsamic vinegar
  • 2 Tbs. Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 bunches watercress, large stems removed

Tweaks

  • I did not have so I used fresh cilantro from the garden instead
  • 8-10 fresh green beans cut in to bite size pieces
  • 5 cherry tomatoes halved
  • ¼ cup frozen corn

How:

Preheat an oven to 400º.

In a bowl, combine the potatoes, olive oil, thyme, salt and pepper and toss to coat. Transfer to a baking sheet or a small roasting pan and roast until the potatoes are tender, golden and crisp, about 1 hour. Let cool for about 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk together the vinegar (I used 18 year old) and mustard until blended. Add the extra-virgin olive oil in a slow, steady stream, whisking constantly until smooth and emulsified. Season the vinaigrette with salt and pepper.

In another small bowl combine the green beans, tomatoes and corn with 1-2 Tbsp. of vinaigrette set aside.

In a large bowl, combine the potatoes, cilantro, green bean, tomatoes, corn and vinaigrette, to taste, and toss to mix.

   

              

Oven Roasted Steak Fries

I love French fires but all that oil gets to my stomach so I was always looking for an alternative. Rachel Ray gave me the idea I just change it up depending on what else I am cooking. Might as well make them complement my main meal right?

Ingredients

  • 3 medium russet potatoes washed, scrubbed and dried.
    • I have used sweet potatoes are good but they do not keep their firmness.
    • You can use any potato you want, some will work some won’t.
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • Here is where you can change it up, choose
    • A few twist of fresh ground pepper to taste or
    • Herbs de Provence or
    • Crushed Rosemary, Basil and Thyme or
    • Vinegar salt or
    • Cayenne or
    • I think you get the idea, endless

How

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.

Leaving peel on, cut the potatoes lengthwise, about 3/4-inch to 1-inch wide. Combine the potatoes, oil, salt and your choice of herbs on the baking sheet and toss to combine. Arrange the potatoes on a baking sheet in a single layer, but evenly spaced so the potatoes aren’t touching. Bake until golden brown and cooked through, about 30 minutes turning over about ¾ through. I have read some recipes that say that if the skin side is on bottom last they come out better but I just spread, bake and turn.

Spicy Blue Potatoes & Corn Salad.

I wondered why I open the lower frig draw and saw blue or purple potatoes, I’m color blind can’t tell the difference, was Lyn hinting she wanted something different, was she challenging my adventurousness? Then she came to me and said those words I have heard so many times before, “Do you think you could make this?”(from  Isa Chandra Moskowitz). Sure no problem but what will we have with it, soon there was a trip to the meat market and a steak, pork chop and a couple of pounds of ground sirloin later we were headed back to our kitchen. Who would have thought a few potatoes could lead to a trip to the Meat House. New butcher shop we found via LivingSocials so we decided to try it we will compare to Wholefoods quality. Forget about what we have in the freezer this called for fresh meat.

Serves 6

Prep 20 minutes

Total time includes cooling about 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 3 ears of corn  ( about 2 ¼ cups of frozen kernels)
  • 3 Pounds Blue potatoes, peeled and cut into ½” pieces
  • 3 table spoons red wine vinegar
  • 2 canned chipotles, seeded and mashed into a paste
  • 2 Tbsp. Adobe sauce from the chipotles can
  • 2 tsp. of grape seed oil (I did not have grape seed oil, so olive oil for me)
  • 1 tsp. light agave nectar
  • 2 Tbsp. water
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. garlic grated or minced very fine
  • 1 (16 ounce) can pinto beans. Drained and rinsed
  • 2 Tbsp. finely chopped red onion (I did not have red onions but had shallots so I used them)1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro mixed greens for serving. Smoked paprika (optional)
  • ¼ red bell pepper finely chopped (Steve tweak)

How

Prepare your steamer while you prep the veggies.

First steam the corn about 5 minutes if on cob, about 2 minutes if frozen kernels. Remove the corn from the steamer put aside to cool.

Place the potatoes in the steamer and steam for about 7-8 minutes until tender enough to pierce with a fork, but not falling apart.  Remove and set aside to cool.

In the meantime, preparing the dressing.  Note: I usually just put the ingredients together in a bowl eyeing the measurements but decided to take a picture hence the little bowls that Lyn got me a while back for prepping. In a small mixing bowl stir together the vinegar, chipotles, adobo, oil, agave, water, and salt. Grate in the garlic or add the minced garlic.

When the corn is cool enough to handle, place in a larger mixing bowl pointy side up. Steve Hint: I like to place a small cup or bowl bottom side up inside the bowl and place the flat side on the cob on the bowl bottom making a stand. This makes it easier to run you knife along the corn cob removing the kernels from the cob. Break apart separating kernels. If using frozen corn then all that is done already isn’t it.

Fold in the cooled potatoes, pinto beans, red pepper and red onion (shallot).

Add the dressing and toss to coat. Mix in the cilantro and taste for salt.  You can add the paprika now to taste if you want. Chill until ready to serve on top of some mixed greens

Steve tweak: Instead of steaming the corn on the cob I would grill on the BBQ that would add a smoky flavor and sweeten up the corn little.