A Sweet And Tangy Kale Slaw From The Famed Moosewood Restaurant

Thanks Nicole!!

January-2014-eNews-Confetti-Kale-from-Moosewood-269-2-862x1024The famed Moosewood Restaurant in Ithaca, N.Y., celebrated its 40th anniversary last year. The natural foods eatery has generated a dozen cookbooks. Dishes like the colorful kale slaw featured here have kept Moosewood going through the decades. (Click here to see the recipe.)

This fresh vegetarian dish – which can be pulled together in about 30 minutes – is both sweet and tangy. It combines several foods that are good for you:  kale, apples, greens, carrots, and celery.

Our fruity Arbequina would be perfect for preparing the fresh orange and lemon juice dressing, which also features apple cider vinegar.

The recipe appears in Moosewood’s latest cookbook, Moosewood Restaurant Favorites (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2013). The book walks you through the steps for prepping the slaw.

“Several of the vegetables are described as shredded, by the that sometimes we mean shredded with a hand grater and sometimes shredded with a sharp knife,” the book notes. “It could get confusing, so we give you specific instructions for prepping the vegetables.” (Click here to see the recipe.)

The slaw can be served immediately. Letting it sit “intensifies” the sweetness. The dish will keep in the fridge two or three days.

Bon appétit,    California Olive Ranch Master Miller Bob Singletary

Salads and Dressings

Confetti Kale Slaw

Recipe courtesy of Moosewood Restaurant Favorites (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2013), by the Moosewood Collective

Ingredients
  • ½ cup orange juice
  • ¼ cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1 Tbs. apple cider vinegar
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • ¼  tsp. salt
  • ¼ tsp. ground black pepper
  • 1 large firm apple, shredded (1-2 cups)
  • 1 cup shredded green or red cabbage
  • 1 cup shredded carrots
  • 1 cup minced celery
  • ¼ cup minced scallions
  • 3 cups shredded kale, packed

Directions

  1. To make dressing: Whisk together orange juice, lemon juice, vinegar, olive oil, salt, and black pepper in a large bowl.
  2. Prepare apple and vegetables and place them in the bowl as you go: Peel the apple or don’t, and shred it on large-holed side of a hand grater. To prevent apples from discoloring, toss well with dressing.
  3. Thinly slice cabbage and cut across the slices about every inch. Peel carrots and shred on large-holed side of a hand grater. Mince celery. Mince scallions.
  4. To shred kale: Rinse kale leaves and shake off excess water. Strip leaves from large stems and pile on a chopping board. Gather kale into a compact mass and thinly slice it. Then cut down across slices, chopping kale into 1- to 2- inch pieces. Go after larger pieces of kale that got away from you when you were slicing it.
  5. Add shredded kale to bowl and toss well. Delicious served right away, but the sweetness intensifies as it sits. This slaw will keep in the refrigerator two to three.

January-2014-eNews-Confetti-Kale-from-Moosewood-269-2-862x1024

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Black Bean and Butternut Squash Burritos

Black Bean and Butternut Squash Burritos

Nicole told me about this and I practically forced her to send me the link, my wife adores butternut squash and is always looking for another way to have me prepare for her. This looked so good I had to share on the site. Butternut Squash is one of my favorite squashes so versatile, tasty and good.

Black Bean and Butternut Squash Burritos

The best burritos I’ve ever made. Also, the only burritos I’ve ever made. But quite possibly the best I’ve tasted! These burritos have a kick of heat to them (that you can control yourself) and a light sweetness thanks to the butternut squash. The filling is so good I found myself eating it on its own. Use it to sprinkle on salads or as a dip for crackers in addition to making burritos. You could also try using sweet potato or pumpkin as a way to change up the butternut filling.

blackbean and butternutaquash buritto12

Yield: 4 burritos or 3.5 cups of filling

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium butternut squash, peeled, cubed, & roasted
  • 1/2 cup uncooked short grain brown rice (yields: 1.5 cups cooked)
  • 1-2 tsp olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped sweet onion
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 red pepper, chopped
  • 1 tsp kosher salt, or to taste
  • 2 tsp ground cumin, or to taste
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper, or to taste
  • One 15-oz can black beans (about 1.5-2 cups cooked), drained and rinsed
  • 3/4 cup Daiya cheese
  • 4 tortilla wraps (large or x-large)
  • Toppings of choice: (avocado, salsa, vegan sour cream, spinach/lettuce, cilantro, etc)

1. Preheat oven to 425F and line a large glass dish with tinfoil. Drizzle olive oil on squash and give a shake of salt and pepper. Coat with hands. Roast chopped butternut squash for 45 mins. or until tender.

2. Cook brown rice

3. In a large skillet over medium-low heat, add oil, onion, and minced garlic. Sautee for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Now add in salt and seasonings and stir well.

blackbean and butternutaquash buritto3

4.  Add chopped red pepper, black beans, and cooked rice and sauté for another 10 mins. on low.

blackbean and butternutaquash buritto4

5. When b’nut squash is tender remove from oven and cool slightly. Add 1.5 cups of the cooked butternut squash to the skillet and stir well. You can mash the squash with a fork if some pieces are too large. Add Daiya cheese and heat another couple minutes.

blackbean and butternutaquash buritto5

6. Add bean filling to tortilla along with desired toppings. Wrap and serve. Leftover filling can be reheated the next day for lunch in a wrap or as a salad topper.

blackbean and butternutaquash buritto7blackbean and butternutaquash buritto8blackbean and butternutaquash buritto9blackbean and butternutaquash buritto10blackbean and butternutaquash buritto11

blackbean and butternutaquash buritto13

Posted By Angela (Oh She Glows) On October 24, 2011 @ 7:47 am

Good as topper also

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Related articles

Butternut and Green Apple Soup (Stevesacooking.com)

One more thing to do with butternut Squash when on sale (Stevesacooking.com)

Black Bean and Butternut Squash Burritos (ohsheglows.com)

Ten Easy and Amazing Recipes Using Butternut Squash (kalynskitchen.com)

Meatless Monday: Roasted Butternut Squash and Black Bean Enchiladas (blogher.com)

Roasted Butternut Squash Carrot Soup (thecocinamonologues.com)

Steel-Cut Oatmeal With Fruit

Steel-Cut Oatmeal With Fruit

 

So many kinds so many questionsI used to be a Quick Cook Oats and even tried those instant packages (yuck) thanks to Lyn I am a Old Fashion Oats guy, while she is a Rolled or Steel Oats gal. Hey everyone has their own taste and who’s to say you are right or wrong.  Joe and my wife both cook a weeks worth Lyn has it all set in the frig in individual servings while I use my cook what I eat method every morning. I have been known to wander over to her side from time to time.

Old Fashioned Oats, Steel Cut Oats and Quick Cooking Oats

Old Fashioned Oats, Steel Cut Oats and Quick Cooking Oats

Steel-Cut Oats – We get steel-cut oats when the whole groat is split into several pieces. Simmered with water, steel-cut oats retain much of their shape and make a chewy, nutty-tasting porridge. Substitute: Whole Oat Groats

Rolled Oats – Whole grains of oats can also be steamed to make them soft and pliable, and then pressed between rollers and dried. The resulting “rolled oats” re-absorb water and cook much more quickly than whole groats or steel-cut oats. When a recipe calls for “rolled oats” or the packaging mentions it, they generally mean the thickest rolled oat, which retains its shape fairly well during cooking. Substitute: Quick oats can be substituted, but the texture will be lost

Old-Fashioned Oats – The source of much confusion, old-fashioned oats are actually the same as rolled oats. You’ll usually see them called “Old-Fashioned Rolled Oats” on packaging.

Quick Cook Oats

Quick Cook Oats

Quick or Quick-Cooking Oats – These are oats that have been pressed slightly thinner than rolled oats. They cook more quickly, but retain less of their texture. Substitute: Rolled Oats or Instant Oats

 

Instant oatmeal

Instant oatmeal

 

Instant Oats – Pressed even thinner than quick oats, instant oats often break into a coarse powder. They cook the quickest of all and make a very soft and uniform mush (erm…for lack of a better description). Substitute: Quick Oats

Hotel Morning Oats – Then there was the oatmeal at the hotel in Minnesota last trip, I think you could have put up wall paper with it, talk about stick to your ribs Joe.

Joe P. Whitney Jr.
“This is what I make Tony and I every week for breakfast. I double the batch and add 16 dates, 1/3 c raisins, 1/3 c of walnuts, cinnamon, and vanilla. It’s so amazing!! It sticks to your ribs. Don’t really get hungry till about ten. Try it!!”

Steel-Cut Oatmeal With Fruit

Joe's oatmeal

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups water
  • 2 cups low-fat milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt (or to taste)
  • 1 cup steel-cut oats
  • 1 teaspoon unsalted butter (optional)
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons dried fruit, such as raisins, chopped dried apricots, dried cranberries
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons maple syrup, agave syrup, honey or brown sugar (more to taste)
  • Fresh fruit (such as diced apples and pears, optional)

How:

1. Combine the water, milk and salt in a large, heavy saucepan, and bring to a boil. Slowly add the oats, stirring constantly. Reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer 15 minutes, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon. Stir in the butter, dried fruit and sweetener. Cover, and continue to simmer for another 10 to 15 minutes, stirring often to prevent the cereal from sticking to the bottom of the pan, until the oats are soft and the mixture is creamy. Serve, with added fruit stirred in if desired, or refrigerate and reheat as desired. Or freeze as follows:

2. Line ice cube trays with plastic wrap. Fill each cube with oatmeal, cover with plastic wrap and freeze. Once frozen solid, remove the cubes from the ice tray and freeze in a plastic bag. For each portion, thaw three or four cubes in a microwave on the defrost setting. Add additional warm milk if desired.

Yield: Four servings.

Advance preparation: Cooked steel-cut oats will keep for five days in the refrigerator and can be reheated atop the stove or in the microwave.

Note: Although my steel-cut oats come in a container with directions for cooking them in the microwave, I don’t find the results satisfactory. The oatmeal doesn’t have the time it needs to swell and release its starch into the liquid, so the liquid never gets creamy and the oatmeal doesn’t soften properly. A better way to save time is to soak the oats overnight. Bring 2 cups water to a boil. Combine the oats and salt in a bowl, and pour on the water. Leave overnight. In the morning, bring the milk to a simmer in a large saucepan, and stir in the oats and any liquid remaining in the bowl. Add the remaining ingredients, and simmer 15 minutes, until creamy, stirring often.

articleLarge

             Blueberry Bread

Joe’s Blueberry Pie

Joe’s Blueberry Pie

I remember as a kid we used to go to Auntie D’s house to make pies. The adults, under her direction, would all be busy making pie after pie Apple, Blueberry, mixed berry…….. she was and still is in everyone’s mind the measuring stick when it came to pies. Across the street there was a path in the woods, long since taken over by development, to the cranberry bogs and along the way was a gold mine of blueberry bushes. Big fat blueberries all there for the picking. Now this was the important job of the kids fill the buckets and eating our fill. The thought of one of her pies after dinner kept us under control and the buckets returned full. A few years back my wife and I went blueberry picking in Beebe Woods and quickly retreated because of the immediate and massive horse fly attack we fell to. That sure took the romanticism out of picking, there they were bushes, branches plump with hundreds of blueberries under the guard of a flying army. We did find the nearest convenient store and sprayed ourselves but it was just not the same. Anyway I babble…..Joe and I were talking about me buying 4 cases of blueberries from Wholefoods when they had them organic $1.99 a pint. I froze some, made some blueberry syrup, jam, Lyn made muffins and probably bread but mostly I would throw a handful in my morning oatmeal taking advantage of the memory boosting powers of blueberries. They are gone except for a bottle or two of the syrup and I am staring to have trouble remembering why I started writing this  only kidding….so hear ya go  Joe’s Blueberry pie.

Cooks Illustrated Published July 1, 1995.  

Makes one 9-inch pie, serving 6 to 8.

Why this recipe works:

For many years we have tried using flour and cornstarch to thicken fresh fruit pies, but the results have been uniformly poor. After testing cornstarch, flour, tapioca, and arrowroot, we found that the samples of fruit thickened with the root starches, arrowroot and tapioca, were clear and bright in appearance and had the clearest fruit flavor. Of the two, tapioca showed a bit more thickening power and was therefore our favorite. So we developed a fruit pie recipe employing this favorite.

The amount of sugar and tapioca you use is relative, depending on the fruit’s quality and your taste. If you prefer a less sweet pie or if the fruit is especially sweet, use the lower sugar amount. If you like your pie juices fairly thick, or if the fruit is really juicy, then opt for the higher amount of tapioca. If you are using frozen fruit, measure it frozen, but let it thaw before filling the pie. If not, you run the risk of partially cooked fruit and undissolved tapioca.

Joe's Blueberry Pie

Joe’s Blueberry Pie

Ingredients

  • Pie Dough
  • 2 1/4cups unbleached all-purpose flour , plus extra for dusting
  • 1teaspoon table salt
  • 2tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 11tablespoons unsalted butter , cut into 1/4-inch cubes
  • 7tablespoons vegetable shortening , chilled
  • 1/3cup water , chilled with ice, increasing up to 3/8 cup, if needed
  • Blueberry Filling
  • 3pints fresh blueberries (6 cups), rinsed and picked over
  • 3/4cup granulated sugar
  • 1 small lemon , zested to yield 1 teaspoon zest and juiced to yield 2 teaspoons juice
  • 1/4teaspoon ground allspice
  • pinch ground nutmeg
  • 3–4tablespoons quick-cooking tapioca
  • 2tablespoons unsalted butter , cut into small pieces

Instructions

1. Mix flour, salt, and sugar in food processor fitted with steel blade. Scatter butter pieces over flour mixture, tossing to coat butter with a little flour. Cut butter into flour with five 1-second pulses. Add shortening and continue to cut it in until flour is pale yellow and resembles coarse cornmeal with butter bits no larger than small peas, about four more 1-second pulses. Turn mixture into medium bowl.

2. Sprinkle all but 1 tablespoon of the ice water over mixture. With blade of rubber spatula, use folding motion to mix. Press down on dough with broad side of spatula until dough sticks together, adding up to 1 tablespoon of remaining ice water if dough does not come together. Divide dough into two balls, one slightly larger than the other. Flatten each into 4-inch-wide disk. Dust lightly with flour, wrap separately in plastic, and refrigerate at least 30 minutes.

3. Remove dough from refrigerator; let stand at room temperature to soften slightly, about 10 minutes. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Toss fruit with sugar, lemon juice and zest, spices, and tapioca; let stand for 15 minutes.

4. Roll larger dough disk on lightly floured surface into 12-inch circle, about 1/8-inch thick. Transfer and fit dough into 9-inch Pyrex pie pan, leaving dough that overhangs the lip in place. Turn fruit mixture, including juices, into pie shell. Scatter butter pieces over fruit. Refrigerate until ready to top with remaining dough.

5. Roll smaller disk on lightly floured surface into 10-inch circle. Lay over fruit. Trim top and bottom dough edges to 1/2-inch beyond pan lip. Tuck this rim of dough underneath itself so that folded edge is flush with pan lip. Flute dough in your own fashion, or press with fork tines to seal. Cut four slits at right angles on dough top to allow steam to escape. If pie dough is very soft, place in freezer for 10 minutes before baking.

6. Place pie on baking sheet; bake until top crust is golden, 20 to 25 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees and continue to bake until juices bubble and crust is golden brown, 30 to 40 minutes longer.

7. Transfer pie to wire rack; let cool to almost room temperature so juices have time to thicken, from 1 to 2 hours.

100_1879

The Apple of My Pie

When making our blueberry pie filling, we found that if we used more than 2 tablespoons of tapioca, the texture of the filling took on a gummy consistency we didn’t like. But 2 tablespoons or less resulted in a filling that was too loose. Could we solve this problem with pectin, a gentle thickener that occurs naturally in fruit?

EXPERIMENT

As a control, we thickened one pie with 2 tablespoons tapioca. We then compared it with a second pie thickened with 2 tablespoons tapioca and a grated apple, which is high in pectin and has a mild flavor. (We hoped that grating the apple would make it less noticeable in the baked pie.)

RESULTS

As expected, the pie thickened with tapioca alone was loose and soupy. But the pie thickened with tapioca plus an apple had a naturally gelled texture that was just right. The apple bits seemed to melt into the berry filling during baking, boosting fruity flavor but leaving no textural sign of their presence.

EXPLANATION

Pectin is a natural substance, found in fruits and vegetables, that creates structure in a plant by helping to bind its cell walls together. This same substance is used to thicken jams and jellies into a set, but soft, mass. Pectin content varies from fruit to fruit and also within a plant (more pectin is found in the skin of a fruit than in its flesh, for example). Apples are a great source of pectin because they contain high levels of high-methoxy pectin, the best natural pectin for making gels. By mashing some of the blueberries and grating the apple, we helped to release the pectin from the fruits’ cell walls so that it could thicken the pie filling.

loose

ON THE LOOSE
Pie filling thickened without enough tapioca won’t firm up. But too much tapioca leads to gumminess.

firm

ALL FIRMED UP
A little tapioca plus a grated apple created a juicy but sliceable filling.

I have some bushes in back yard and only wish that they looked like this, I share with the birds, although got a fake owl this year and actually got a few pints

I

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Glazed Blueberry Chicken

Blueberry oatmeal bread

Jordan Marsh Blueberry Muffins and Pepper Biscuits

Lyn’s Blueberry Oatmeal pancakes

Blueberry Oatmeal Bread

Richard at the office is into baking  he has made some out of this world banana breads, cakes and muffins. He stuck a piece of this in front of me today and said this is great and he was not lying.

This is Heidi from Go bold With Butter  – She must love Ina Garten who uses a lot of butter while cooking.

I’m a lover of quick breads. Pulling together a few ingredients that can be mixed by hand and dumped into one simple pan, then placed in a hot oven to produce a sweet blueberry surprise topped with a pat of butter is what I call a great weekend treat.

The beauty of this recipe is that it comes together so quickly I don’t even have to wait for the weekend to make it. In about the same amount of time it takes to make a morning omelet I can mix the ingredients, then take a quick shower, put on my face and have something fresh from the oven for my daughter before shuttling her off to school.

I love blueberry muffins so adapting the recipe for a quick bread was a natural. Adding heart-healthy oatmeal to the mix gives it a bonus kick start for my daughter’s morning, and a pick-me-up for my afternoon snack.

Blueberry Oatmeal Bread

richard 1
By Heidi
Makes one loaf

Ingredients:

1 cup blueberries
2 cups flour, plus 1 tablespoon
1 cup sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup Greek yogurt
2 eggs
½ cup (1 stick) butter, melted and cooled slightly
1 teaspoon vanilla
½ cup oats

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375°F. Line a 9×5-inch loaf pan with parchment paper or lightly butter and dust with flour.

In a small bowl, toss blueberries with 1 tablespoon flour to keep blueberries from sinking. In a large bowl, whisk 2 cups flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. In a separate bowl, mix yogurt, eggs, melted butter and vanilla together and then fold into the dry ingredients. Add the blueberries and oats and gently combine.

Scrape the mixture to loaf pan. It will be thick and a little sticky. Bake for 50-55 minutes and golden brown and when a toothpick inserted into the bread comes out clean. Remove from oven and cool in the pan for 5 minutes then cool on a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Related post

Jordan Marsh Blueberry Muffins

Pancakes

Healthy Breakfast Scones

GALE’S PASSOVER TREAT RECIPE

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3 SQUARES OF PLAIN MATZAH

1 CUP BAKERS SHREDDED COCONUT

1 CUP CRANBERRY CRASINS

3 CUPS GHRIADELHI DARK CHOCOLATE MORSELS

1 CUP OF SLIVERED ALMONDS (TOAST IN 350 DEGREE OVEN FOR 7 MINUTES)

 

DIRECTIONS:

CRUMBLE THE 3 SQUARES OF MATZAH INTO SMALL PIECES

THEN MIX ALL THE INGREDIENTS EXCEPT THE CHOCOLATE TOGETHER WITH THE MATZAH

 

MELT:

3 CUPS GHRIADELHI DARK CHOCOLATE MORSELS UNTIL SMOOTH.

ADD THE CHOCOLATE TO THE ABOVE DRIED INGREDIENTS

PLACE WAX PAPER ON COOKING SHEET; THEN SPREAD THE MIXTURE OUT ON THE COOKIE SHEET AND FLATTEN WITH A METAL SPATCHLER.

REFRIDGERATE OVER NIGHT AND THEN BREAK INTO PIECES

GALE’S PASSOVER TREAT RECIPE

HAPPY PESACH!

 

ENJOY