Red Onion Relish

Red Onion Relish

We bought a bunch of red onions and remembered something we had made a long time ago turkey cutlets with red onion relish so I quickly decided we need some of this relish in the frig, it was good on that dish as well as chicken, burgers and on top of a regular salad.

Sweet-meets-savory relish gives a refreshing kick to this quick-to-fix main dish — the only prep step is chopping the onions.

Ingredients:

•             1  tablespoon(s) olive oil

•             1  large (1-pound) red onion, thinly sliced

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•             3  tablespoon(s) sugar

•             3  tablespoon(s) cider vinegar

•             1/2  teaspoon(s) salt

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How:

In 12-inch, nonstick skillet, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil on medium 1 minute. Add sliced onion and cook 15 minutes or until very soft, stirring occasionally.

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Stir in sugar, cider vinegar, and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Reduce heat to low and simmer 5 minutes longer.

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Makes about 1 cup relish.

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Missi’s Dill Chicken with Tomato-Dill Relish

Missi’s Dill Chicken with Tomato-Dill Relish

I’ve been relatively quiet these days, outside cleanup has taken a lot of my time just getting outside without bundling up is great. Lyn and I took a road trip, the ultimate test of the Prius, and gave a new meaning to a tank full of gas trip. We drove from Milford MA to Washington DC on about 10 gallons of gas about 58 MPG. Spent more of tolls than gas, heck spent more on what they pass off  as food at service areas than on gas. You get closer to DC and it is rural and you soon come to the realization that there is nothing at the exits and the service areas are the only choice.  Traffic gods were nice to us on the way down but on the way back they laid out one traffic jam after another. Amazingly enough after all these years of together we can still stay in a confined place together for long periods of time. Anyway we made it to DC and Missi even gave up her parking spot for us she guided us in over the phone as we drew close. It was a wonderful visit laid back and comfortable, individually they are great, together they are pretty perfect. Missi gently pounded the chicken as the 4 of us along with the cat and dog sat around the kitchen talking. Ever notice that the kitchen is the hang out room?  This chicken immediately made it to my favorite list and yesterday we tried to duplicate, did a good job but I just could not duplicate that missing ingredient “Missi Love”.

Simple and delicious

Ingredients

  • 4 (6-ounces) skinless boneless chicken breast halves
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup chopped dill
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped shallot
  • 1 tablespoon grainy mustard
  • 1 tablespoon white-wine vinegar
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes, quartered

ingredients

How:

Prepare grill for direct-heat cooking over hot charcoal (medium-high heat for gas)

Pound chicken 1/4 inch thick between 2 sheets of plastic wrap with flat side of a meat pounder or with a rolling pin.

pound chicken (1)

Whisk together oil, dill, shallot, mustard, and vinegar in a large bowl. Set aside 1/4 cup.

vinergarette

Sprinkle chicken evenly with 1 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper, then add to dill mixture, turning to coat.

tuen to coat

Toss tomatoes with reserved dill mixture and salt and pepper to taste if you want.

quarter tomatoes add sauce

toss

Grill chicken, turning once, until just cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes total.

grill

Serve topped with relish.

cover

palted

dill chicken

Glazed Blueberry Chicken

Glazed Blueberry Chicken

You may have read that I am addicted to my 18 year old balsamic vinegar, well the last time I ordered online they accidentally sent me a bottle of blueberry balsamic vinegar along with that I ordered. Their mistake was quickly fixed and the blueberry was mine to play with for free!! I thought that it would be great on some fresh fruit, which it was, I tried over avocado but not quite my thing then my wife handed me the Silver Palate cook book and asked do you think you could make this. I have trouble refusing those eyes and a new recipe always excites me. After she said that she had been waiting for 25 years to try something like this what do I think about raspberry?

 

Yield: 2 to 4 servings

 

Ingredients

  • 1 chicken, 2 1/2 to 3 lbs., cut into quarters (or I just use boneless thighs)*
  • 1/2 c blueberry vinegar
  • 1 tsp. dried thyme
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1/3 c blueberry chutney
  • chopped Italian parsley and grated zest of an orange for garnish

 

*Note: I just used 2 bone in chicken breast there is only 2 of us but did make the same amount of marinade since it would become the sauce.

 

How:

Combine chicken quarters, blueberry vinegar, and thyme in a bowl and marinate 2 hours.

marinate

Pre-heat oven to 300 degrees. Arrange chicken, skin side up, in a glass baking dish. Reserve marinade. Season the chicken lightly with salt and pepper and coat with chutney.

Set baking dish on the center rack of the oven and bake, uncovered, 40 minutes, or until done. Transfer chicken to a serving platter, cover, and keep warm.

roast

Skim the fat from the cooking juices and move to a saucepan over medium heat. Add the marinade and bring to a boil. Reduce by 1/3 or until sauce is lightly thickened.  Pour over chicken and garnish with fresh parsley and orange zest. (You can also stir in some fresh blueberries to the sauce in the saucepan when you are simmering that.)

sauce

Serve.

Bluebery glazed Chicken SERVE

Other posts

Balsamic Vinegar

Pan Seared Chicken Breasts with Lemon Herb Pan Sauce

Simple Balsamic Vinaigrette

Simple Balsamic Vinaigrette

For my birthday my wife gave us a cooking class at Stonewall Kitchen which was great had a really good time which started with Pina Coladas on the beach but those are both another story for another time.

This post is about my love of Balsamic Vinegar.

Hanging with the chef

Hanging with the chef

A few years back we discovered eighteen year old balsamic vinegar at LeRoux Kitchen in Portland Maine. You can drink this stuff it’s just so good. They are online but also have stores at Martha’s Vineyard, MA and Portsmouth, NH so where Stonewall Kitchen is in York Maine we decided to stay just a few minutes away in Portsmouth NH on the river. Portsmouth has a nice walking downtown with small shops and a lot of restaurants it has the feel of a college town with a touch of tourism to me.

View from the room PortsmouthNorthChurch_lg Portsmouth Downtown

Anyway, armed with our 5 empty bottles we clinked our way to the store and had them refilled. All set for a few months now. Which brings me to the point of this post Vinaigrette dressings they can be simple or complicated but once you get in the habit of making your own fresh you will not go back to the off the shelf bottle. Ok maybe in a pinch.

I mostly wing it but here are a few that I have made or tried. Oh before I forget they are not just for salads so experiment and see. Let me know some of your favorites.

How: They all prepare similarly so

Beat the vinegar in a bowl with the optional sugar, garlic, salt and pepper until sugar and salt dissolves. Then beat in the oil by droplets, whisking constantly. (Or place all the ingredients in a screw-top jar and shake to combine.) Taste and adjust the seasonings.

Nice little gadget!

Nice little gadget! I snuffed at first.

Simple Balsamic Vinaigrette

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons dark brown sugar, optional
  • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 3/4 cup olive oil

Note: With a good quality balsamic you may not need to add a sweetener that depends on your tooth as the saying goes.

My version of someone’s house dressing

  • 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard – Trader Joe’s add a kick
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed or minced finely if you like a stronger garlic flavor
  • 3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Another twist

  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 tablespoon whole grain dijon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed or minced if you like a stronger garlic flavor

Yet another twist

  • 1/4 cup red wine (any variety)
  • 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 teaspoons fruit jam or 2 teaspoons jelly
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil

Options:

  • Try a teaspoon of lemon juice
  • Honey
  • Add some grated cheese
  • Chopped cilantro or mint or oregano or…..

 Maple vinaigrette dressing (Cooks.com)

  • 2 oz balsamic vinegar
  • 2 oz malt vinegar
  • 2 oz rice vinegar
  • 1 clove fresh chopped garlic
  • 3 teaspoons stone ground mustard
  • 9 oz olive oil
  • 4 oz maple syrup
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons oregano
  • ¼ teaspoon cilantro

How:

Add garlic and vinegars together and let sit overnight to infuse flavors. Strain. (Garlic pieces may be left in for stronger garlic taste.)

Blend oil, vinegars and mustard until mixture is well emulsified. Stir in maple syrup. Add cilantro, pepper and oregano (to taste). Stir and shake well prior to serving.

May substitute vinegar favorites, berry syrups for maple and substitute or add favorite spices to taste. Oil/vinegar ratio may also be adjusted to taste.

 Basil Vinaigrette (simplyrecipes.com)

Ingredients:

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 shallot, chopped

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon sugar

1/2 cup roughly chopped basil leaves

1/4 cup white wine vinegar

3/4 cup olive oil

How:

1 Place the salt, sugar, mustard, shallot and basil in a blender or food processor. Pulse several times to combine. Scrape the sides of the blender down with a spatula. Add the vinegar and pulse again.

2 Turn the blender on low and take off the cap in the center of the blender’s lid. Slowly pour in the olive oil. It may sputter a little out of the open cap, so hold you hand over it to minimize splashing.

3 When the olive oil is incorporated, turn off the blender and scrape the sides down one more time. Cover and purée everything for 1-2 minutes.

Store covered in the fridge for up to a week.

Oils|Vinegars Subcategory images

White and Dark balsamic Vinegar

I was told at the class that the difference is the dark is cooked but here is another opinion that backs that up …to say it’s just the color is a little too simple…balsamic vinegar is made from white grapes and are fermented over decades…they take some out after a year and cook it under pressure to maintain its clearness, and that is the white balsamic….the other as I said is left to ferment for years and that’s the dark. Me again..I should add that now a days the grocery stores have a way to speed up the process

I believe with the good stuff that each year stated the vinegar is processed in another barrel.

balsamic_battery

About Balsamic Vinegar here is an interesting article

Because balsamic vinegar is one of olive oil’s natural companions, we thought it might be useful to discuss in some detail this complex product, especially since prices can fluctuate even more wildly than olive oil (between a $3.00 pint and a $50.00 ounce).

The highest art of vinegar (aceto in Italian) making in Italy is known as Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale (ABT).  Sadly, the reputation of this exceptional product has been bastardized by low-grade products bearing the same name and which only ever so faintly resemble the real thing.  There are, however, two bits of good news.  First, it is quite simple to recognize a ‘real’ ABT.  It will be always be sold in one of two distinct bottle types (the difference being that of the two competing DOC’s, Modena and Reggio Emilia, both strictly controlled by respective ‘Consorzios’1). Second, you do not always need the best balsamico for every dish and, in fact, that might be ill-advised even if you could afford it. Read more

Salt and Vinegar Broiled Fingerling Potatoes

Salt and Vinegar Broiled Fingerling Potatoes

Salt and Vinegar Broiled Fingerling Potatoes from Umami Girl

Lyn and I are on a Salt and Vinegar baked potato chip kick (Kettle Chips Baked)  so much so that we order directly a case at a time, individual size, my god a big bag would be too much we have no self-control once the bag is open. When I saw Umami Girl’s “Salt and Vinegar Broiled Fingerling Potatoes” on Pinterest I just had to try I like a good oven fried potatoes.

I made no changes but will try with malt vinegar.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound fingerling potatoes, sliced lengthwise to 1/4-inch thickness*
  • 2 cups white or malt vinegar
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Kosher Salt
  • Pepper

How:

1. In a small pot, combine the potato slices and vinegar. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer until fork-tender, about 8 minutes. Let cool in liquid for 30 minutes. Then drain well and pat potatoes dry with paper towels.

2. Preheat the broiler with a rack about 6 inches below the heat source. Dump the potato slices onto a sheet pan, sprinkle very generously with olive oil, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Arrange the potato slices in a single layer. Broil until lightly browned on top, about 7 minutes. Then flip the slices and broil until the underside is lightly browned, about 5 minutes more. Serve warm.

Spicy Blue Potatoes & Corn Salad.

I wondered why I open the lower frig draw and saw blue or purple potatoes, I’m color blind can’t tell the difference, was Lyn hinting she wanted something different, was she challenging my adventurousness? Then she came to me and said those words I have heard so many times before, “Do you think you could make this?”(from  Isa Chandra Moskowitz). Sure no problem but what will we have with it, soon there was a trip to the meat market and a steak, pork chop and a couple of pounds of ground sirloin later we were headed back to our kitchen. Who would have thought a few potatoes could lead to a trip to the Meat House. New butcher shop we found via LivingSocials so we decided to try it we will compare to Wholefoods quality. Forget about what we have in the freezer this called for fresh meat.

Serves 6

Prep 20 minutes

Total time includes cooling about 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 3 ears of corn  ( about 2 ¼ cups of frozen kernels)
  • 3 Pounds Blue potatoes, peeled and cut into ½” pieces
  • 3 table spoons red wine vinegar
  • 2 canned chipotles, seeded and mashed into a paste
  • 2 Tbsp. Adobe sauce from the chipotles can
  • 2 tsp. of grape seed oil (I did not have grape seed oil, so olive oil for me)
  • 1 tsp. light agave nectar
  • 2 Tbsp. water
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. garlic grated or minced very fine
  • 1 (16 ounce) can pinto beans. Drained and rinsed
  • 2 Tbsp. finely chopped red onion (I did not have red onions but had shallots so I used them)1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro mixed greens for serving. Smoked paprika (optional)
  • ¼ red bell pepper finely chopped (Steve tweak)

How

Prepare your steamer while you prep the veggies.

First steam the corn about 5 minutes if on cob, about 2 minutes if frozen kernels. Remove the corn from the steamer put aside to cool.

Place the potatoes in the steamer and steam for about 7-8 minutes until tender enough to pierce with a fork, but not falling apart.  Remove and set aside to cool.

In the meantime, preparing the dressing.  Note: I usually just put the ingredients together in a bowl eyeing the measurements but decided to take a picture hence the little bowls that Lyn got me a while back for prepping. In a small mixing bowl stir together the vinegar, chipotles, adobo, oil, agave, water, and salt. Grate in the garlic or add the minced garlic.

When the corn is cool enough to handle, place in a larger mixing bowl pointy side up. Steve Hint: I like to place a small cup or bowl bottom side up inside the bowl and place the flat side on the cob on the bowl bottom making a stand. This makes it easier to run you knife along the corn cob removing the kernels from the cob. Break apart separating kernels. If using frozen corn then all that is done already isn’t it.

Fold in the cooled potatoes, pinto beans, red pepper and red onion (shallot).

Add the dressing and toss to coat. Mix in the cilantro and taste for salt.  You can add the paprika now to taste if you want. Chill until ready to serve on top of some mixed greens

Steve tweak: Instead of steaming the corn on the cob I would grill on the BBQ that would add a smoky flavor and sweeten up the corn little.