Instant Pot Corned Beef Brisket

Instant Pot Corned Beef Brisket

Once a year sometimes maybe twice we make a corned beef brisket, yes usually around St Patrick’s Day.

Instant Pot here we try.

Instant Pot Corned Beef

I adapted this recipe stayed with the packet that came with the brisket from Nourish To Fuel.

Ingredients

  • 3-4 pound Corned Beef Brisket
  • 3 cups Beef Broth
  • 3 cups Water
  • 1 Shallot, peeled and roughly chopped (substitute ¼ medium onion)
  • 3 Garlic Cloves, peeled and whole
  • 15 Whole Black Peppercorns
  • 9 Whole Allspice
  • 3 Bay Leaves
  • 5 sprigs Fresh Thyme
  • 6 small to medium Red Potatoes, rinsed and cut into eighths (optional)
  • 5 Carrots, peeled and cut into 2-3 inch pieces
  • 2 Shallots, minced (substitute ½ minced onion)
  • 2 cloves Garlic, minced
  • ½ teaspoon Diamond Kosher Salt
  • 1 head green Cabbage, cut into 8 wedges
  • Instructions
  1. Place corned beef brisket in Instant Pot fat side up. Add beef broth, water, rough chopped shallot, 3 garlic cloves, peppercorns, allspice, bay leaves, and thyme.
  2. Place lid on Instant Pot in locked position, making sure vent is sent to “sealing”. Plug in Instant Pot.
  3. Press “Manual’ and “+” to increase cooking time to 90 minutes at High Pressure.
  4. After a moment the display will turn to “On” while the pot heats up and pressure increases, once the pot has warmed up the display will start counting down.
  5. When finished cooking wait to open lid until the pressure float is down on it’s own, or release pressure manually by moving vent to “venting”. Unplug Instant Pot.
  6. Remove Corned Beef from pot, saving liquid for cabbage, carrots, and optional potatoes. Cover corned beef with aluminum foil and set aside.
  7. Strain cooking liquid with a slotted spoon to remove fat, bay leaves, and thyme.
  8. Place optional potatoes, carrots, shallots, garlic, and salt into cooking liquid then place cabbage on top.
  9. Place lid on Instant Pot in locked position, making sure vent is sent to “sealing”. Plug in Instant Pot.
  10. Press “Manual’ and “+” to increase cooking time to 15 minutes at High Pressure.
  11. After a moment the display will turn to “On” while the pot heats up and pressure increases, once the pot has warmed up the display will start counting down.
  12. When finished cooking wait to open lid until the pressure float is down on it’s own, or release pressure manually by moving vent to “venting”. Unplug Instant Pot.
  13. Remove vegetables from Instant Pot and serve with sliced corned beef.
  14. For Slow-Cooker Variation
  15. Place all ingredients except cabbage (corned beef, beef broth, water, 3 shallots, 5 cloves garlic, peppercorns, allspice, bay leaves, thyme, optional potatoes, and carrots) in large slow-cooker (7 quart or larger), and cook on high for 4 hours.
  16. Add cabbage on top of corned beef, cook for another hour on high.

 

corned beef

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Instant Pot MAPLE SMOKED BRISKET

Instant Pot MAPLE SMOKED BRISKET

I’m such a brisket nut that the first thing I made in our new Instant Pot was a BBQ flat cut brisket. When you cook brisket one of the best things is after a few hours coming back into the house and being taken over by the aroma. Well with the Instant pot you start to get that aroma in maybe 5-10 minutes and it is torture, your stomach starts to tell you Hey! I’m Hungry already FEED ME! I like the fact that with this new toy it does not take long before it is done and ready to eat. The only thing with this recipe was the liquid smoke, although adding that BBQ flavor and smell it was the smell that linger for almost a week. A good and bad thing. I felt like I was walking into a BBQ restaurant which in my mind is pretty much heaven. Anyway……

 

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From BARE Root Girl

Directions:

Remove the brisket from the refrigerator about 30 minutes before cooking.   Pat it dry with paper towels and set it aside.

Mix the spice blend by combining the maple sugar, smoked sea salt, pepper, mustard powder, onion powder, and smoked paprika.   Coat the meat generously on all sides.  The rub will get a bit sticky due to the sugar.

Set your Instant Pot to “Sauté” and allow it to heat up for 2-3 minutes.  Grease the bottom with a bit of high heat cooking oil and add the brisket.  Brown on all sides until deeply golden but not burnt.  Turn the brisket to fatty side up and add the broth, liquid smoke, and thyme to the Instant Pot.  Scrape the browned bits off the bottom and cover with the lid.

Switch the setting to “Manual” and increase the cook time to 50 minutes.  Once finished, allow the Instant Pot to release steam on it’s own (EDIT: I’ve found that using the quick release valve can leave large, leaner cuts of meat tasting a little dry).  Remove the brisket from the pot and cover it with foil to rest.  Switch the Instant Pot to “Saute” again to reduce & thicken the sauce (optional) with the lid off for about 10 minutes.

Slice the brisket on a bias and serve it with your favorite whipped veg (this recipe for Creamy Whipped Parsnips shown here) and drizzle with the reduced sauce.

IMG_20160227_174001077

 

*Notes:

-Make sure you find a liquid smoke that has no additives or MSG.  You can skip the liquid smoke but you’ll get a more subtle smoke flavor.

-With a bit of experimentation, I’ve found that increasing or decreasing your meat size by ½ lb. (when the meat is kept whole and not chopped up) requires about a 10 minute change in cooking time.  For example, 1 lb. needs about 40 minutes, where 2 lb. needs about 60 minutes.  The nice thing about the Instant Pot is that it’s quick and easy to throw the lid back on and add another 10 minutes, as needed.

-If using a slow cooker, brown the brisket in a saute pan before adding it to your slow cooker.  Add the broth to the saute pan to deglaze and grab all the flavor from the browned bits.  Then pour the broth straight into the slow cooker, along with the liquid smoke and thyme.  Cook on “Low” for 6-8 hours or until the meat is tender and slices easily.

 

Texas Style Chili

We recently got back from a trip celebrating our 30 anniversary, had a great time twirling, sipping and spitting wines from Napa to Sonoma. we were befriended by two great ladies, sister in laws,  one was I believe 76 and the other 87 and a hot shit. Phyllis was from Texas and on one excursion we were tasting some local chili and she mumbled beans we don’t put beans in chili in Texas.  Well my wife was inspired and it was not long, this last weekend that I was confronted with another do you think you can make this. The first thing I noticed was brisket and I was sold, I love brisket and have a lot of different recipes take a look at them if you have a chance. I actually just had some for lunch, I love the way the different heats from the chilies come out as you eat.

Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds flat-cut beef brisket, trimmed and cut into 1-inch cubes (I really trimmed most of the fat off the brisket)
  • 1 pound beef stew meat
  • 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper, divided
  • 1 3/4 teaspoons kosher salt, divided
  • 5 teaspoons canola oil, divided
  • 4 cups chopped yellow onion
  • 2 tablespoons dried oregano
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons paprika
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon ancho chile powder
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • 6 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 dried bay leaves
  • 1 dried ancho chile, seeded
  • 1 (6-ounce) can unsalted tomato paste
  • 4 1/2 cups water, divided
  • 1 (12-ounce) lager beer (such as Shiner)
  • 5 tablespoons masa harina
  • 2 teaspoons hot sauce (such as Tabasco)
  • 1/2 cup chopped green onions

Preparation

1. Sprinkle beef with 1 teaspoon pepper and 1 teaspoon salt. Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add 1 teaspoon oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add one-quarter of beef to pan; sauté 3 minutes or until well browned on all sides. Remove beef from pan. Repeat procedure 3 times with 3 teaspoons oil and remaining beef.

brown

2. Add remaining 1 teaspoon oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add onion and next 8 ingredients (through dried chile); sauté 3 minutes. Stir in remaining 1 teaspoon black pepper, remaining 3/4 teaspoon salt, and tomato paste; cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Stir in 4 cups water and beer; bring to a simmer.

combine bring to simmer cover

Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and cook 2 hours or until beef is very tender. Combine remaining 1/2 cup water and masa in a small bowl, stirring with a whisk until smooth. Add masa mixture and hot sauce to pan; cook 3 minutes or until slightly thickened. Discard dried ancho chile and bay leaves. Sprinkle with green onions.

seerve

Reign On Carolina Barbecue Vinegar Barbecue Sauces – Week 11

Reign On Carolina Barbecue Vinegar Barbecue Sauces – Week 11

Thin, tart and full of great flavor – While watching the Pats why not try some local cuisine BBQ shredded Panthers with vinegar based sauces.

Vinegar is the secret ingredient of Carolina Barbecue, particularly apple cider vinegar. Straight cider vinegar is used as a marinade, before cooking, as a baste during cooking and as the primary ingredients of a finishing sauce served on barbecue at the table. The secret of using vinegar with barbecue is to give it time to work it’s way into the meat so that you won’t be left with a strong bitter flavor. You need to balance the sweet flavor of slow cooked meat with the flavor of the vinegar. The advantage to vinegar barbecue sauces is that you can add them in at anytime and the vinegar easily works into the meat. This allows you to add spices and have them sink into the meat giving it plenty of flavor.

apple cider
Of course there is more to a good vinegar barbecue sauce than vinegar. North Carolina is divided on the issue of sauce. On the eastern side, vinegar is kept pure, particularly of those nasty tomatoes. However on the west side barbecue sauces are put together with a hint of tomato and sugar. Now while the purists will keep to these formulas others have taken to the additions of cayenne, brown sugar, molasses, red pepper, red pepper flakes, etc.. These thin sauces can come in so many different variations that they could challenge the thick, sweet sauces in variety.

The vinegar used is usually apple cider vinegar, but plain white vinegar works as well. The advantage of vinegar in sauces is that it has an additional tenderizing effect that helps make barbecue pull apart perfect. The gentle acid of vinegar tenderizes the meat during the process making it as tender as possible

Now, like any other barbecue sauce it is best made in advance. You want to give the flavors time to mix. The vinegar will literally dissolve most anything you add to it. If you add coarse ingredients like red pepper flakes you really need to give it a day or two to pull the flavors out into the vinegar.

Now these would be good with any of my recipes such as:

ribs

root-beer-sauce-gone

pulled pork

brisket sandwich

Here are some local Carolina recipes I found

Pulled Pork Finishing Sauce

North Carolina Vinegar Sauce

This traditional finishing sauce is a wonderful accompaniment to Carolina Style Pulled Pork. It is served on the side and added by the person doing the eating.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Yield: Makes about 1 1/4 cup

Ingredients:

•1 cup cider vinegar
•2 tablespoons salt
•2 tablespoons brown sugar
•1 teaspoon cayenne
•1 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Preparation:

Mix all ingredients together. Let stand as long as possible, at least 1/2 a day, but the longer the better.

North Carolina Vinegar Sauce

Carolina Red

This recipe is a great table sauce for Pulled Pork. Blending both the vinegar and tomato traditions of North Carolina into one.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Yield: Makes about 2 cups

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup ketchup
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne or 1 teaspoon hot red pepper flakes

Big Red BBQ

Preparation:

Combine all the ingredients in a bowl and stir to dissolve the sugar. Serve at room temperature or chilled. The sauce keeps indefinitely.

Hog Mop

Want to smoke a whole hog? This mop not only gives it a great flavor but makes enough to get you through.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 2 minutes
Total Time: 12 minutes
Yield: Makes 5 quarts (You can cut it down in amounts when BBQ or smoking a roast. I would mop more often)

Years ago my sister would hold an annual pig roast I remember the ride home with the pig in the passenger’s seat cigarette butt hanging out of its mouth. We would do either an oil, oregano and rosemary or vinegar based slop. The trick was to get someone to wander over and try out turning the pig on the hand rotated spigot, then you would walk away leaving them with this distraught look of abandonment while you grab and down another beer. It was not long until they figured out the game and there were always enough newbies around. Wish I could find some of those old pictures, ahh that crispy pig skin.

pig on spigget

Ingredients:

• 3 quarts cider vinegar
• 1 1/2 quarts water
• 3/4 cup salt
• 1/4 cup chili powder

mopping

Preparation:

Mix ingredients together and mop hog every other hour.

North Carolina Vinegar Sauce

Prep Time: 5 Minutes
Cook Time: 5 Minutes
Total Time: 10 Minutes
Yield: 2 cups

Ingredients

2 cups apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon ketchup
1 tablespoon Texas Pete’s
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon kosher salt

How

1. Place all of the ingredients in a small, non-reactive sauce pan and bring to a boil. Whisk until the sugar and salt is completely dissolved, remove from heat, and allow to cool to room temperature.
2. Pour the sauce into a jar or squeeze bottle and let rest in the refrigerator one day before using.

Carne-val

Reign on Brisket on Rye Halftime Sandwich – Week 8

Reign on Brisket on Rye Halftime Sandwich – Week 8

There was a chill in the air and a game on Sunday so I felt a Reign on Brisket sandwich was a good choice.  It was more thinking out loud since I did not have a brisket and the one at the store did not look that good. I conceded to next week but when Lyn came home from her errands with a flat cut brisket I had my game plan down.

I usually use a Dutch oven for brisket either on stove top or in the oven but I wanted to go out and not have it on my mind that I had to get back so I grabbed our crock pot figuring I can put on low and disappear all day coming home to a house filled with the smell of yummmm. This is a torture because I like to let it sit overnight before reheating and eating. Never mind the fact that I started around 2 PM which meant low on crock pot was at least 6-8 hours of cook time.

Ingredients

  • One  4 Lbs. flat cut brisket
  • Large onion – cut in chunks
  • About 6-8 carrots – cut in chucks
  • About 10 celery stocks – cut in chucks
  • 1 clove garlic –  slightly crushed
  • 1 cup red wine I had some Merlot
  • 2 cups beef broth
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 loaf of Rye bread
  • Red onion relish

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How

Add a small amount – olive oil over medium high heat – we bought one of those crockpots that you can brown on the stove top in the pot – love it. If you don’t have one then you can brown in a pot just remember to scrap up the brown bits when you deglaze in the vegetables

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Salt and pepper the fattier side of brisket to taste and put that side down in pan listen to that sizzle.

Salt and pepper the top and after 2-3 minutes when bottom is browned nicely flip over and sear for another 2-4 minutes

Remove brisket to platter add all the vegetables and sauté for about 2-4 minutes add Merlot and cook down for about another 2-4 minutes

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Place brisket on top of vegetable and place in crockpot.

Pour the 2 cups of beef broth in cover and cook to low 7-8 hours.

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If you were using another pot to do searing and vegetables transfer veggies then the brisket

I cooked about 7-8 hours transferred to container, let cool and then cover and place in frig overnight.

The next day I sliced in about ¼” while reheating the gravy, added the meat and let sit.

 

There are two schools of thought on this some like to slice the night before and store in the gravy I go either way, this time I waited.

When ready I prepared the sandwich

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Layered the brisket, drizzled with some of the gravy making sure some got into the bread, top with red onion relish served with home mad dill pickles and garden tomatoes.

Brisket Sandwich

Sat down for the second half and watched the Pats fall apart just like the slices of brisket except that melted in my mouth.

Similar dishes from Stevesacooking

Smoked Wilfork Tender Brisket

My Favorite Brisket recipe

Beef Brisket with Caramelized Onions and Merlot Sauce

Meyer Lemon Brisket with Pomegranate Gremolata

Flat, Single or First cut Brisket Jewish style

Smoked Wilfork Tender Brisket

Smoked Wilfork Tender Brisket

I am still on the fend for yourself diet and very much against my promise to Lyn to eat healthy I could not resist the temptation when at BJs and there it was as if it had my name on it a full brisket sitting in an open space in the meat counter all by itself. It was calling me. I told her that I needed it for a Patriots game day recipe and besides most of the fat will render off. She begrudgingly let me win the discussion not only because the fat content in this cut of meat is not healthy for me but I feel more that she knew the aroma that spreads through the neighborhood and the house will be driving us crazy all day. I don’t know about you but there is something about cooking any style of slow cook meal that is tortuous. Go out for a little while and when you come back and enter the house OMG. And I never use that terminology. Think of last Turkeyday when you enter the house and you will know what I mean.

Remember this was a spur of the moment thing so I basically winged it.

Ingredients

  • 1 whole brisket about 8 lbs.
  • Favorite homemade or store bought rub
  • A few large onions chopped
  • Liquid your choice water, beer, broth

 

 

 

How

Presoak some wood chips when ready place in smoking tray. IF you do not have one I use two sheet of aluminum foil make a pouch and put some holes in it. I have used a disposable tin foil tray not covered place on the flame.

I dragged a sharp knife across the beef not going very deep and made a diamond pattern on both sides.

Then I rubbed the beef with my rub, see pulled pork receipe. Wrapped and refrigerate for 1 hour, overnight is much better.

Preheat oven to 225-250 degrees

Place chopped onions and liquid (your choice I only had one beer left so I used broth) enough to cover bottom of roasting pan and cover. If your roasting pan does not have tight cover, cover with aluminum foil tightly. I cook at this temp for about 4 hours

Towards the end prepare your grill. – I have an old gas grill that is only front and back so I cover one side with aluminum foil, poke a few drip holes and replace the grates. On the open side I place the woodchip pouch I made while the grill is heating up to high.

Place the meat on grill fat side up, over the aluminum foil side to get as close to cooking with indirect heat as I could. Next year I swear I will buy a new grill. Cook for another 3-6 hours checking the internal temperature toward the 3 hour mark see below for end temp 180-185. I also would watch the temp of the grill remember with smoking low and slow is the trick. I would open the grill cover from time to time to drop the temperature down around 225 degree.

Whn you reach the correct internal temp place the meat directly over flame and about cook 10 minutes each side.

When done place on platter cover loosely and let sit for about 15-20 minutes. Trim the fat off by running knife under it and put aside there is a lot of great meat and burnt ends in there.

You should have most of the fat removed, now cut thin slices ACROSS the grain.

Serve with your favorite BBQ sauce, coleslaw, corn and beverages in my case only one beer.

With the flat fat piece you remove trim all the meat out and chop it mix with BBQ sauce and serve on buns.

Remember you have to have a lot of will power because it is tortuous smelling this cooking all day.

 

What do they mean by Fork tender

Barbecue experts with years of cooking experience say a brisket is done when it’s “fork tender”, meaning that a fork or a probe thermometer goes in and out of the meat with little resistance. The problem is that both a properly cooked brisket and an overcooked one will both be “fork tender”. For most folks like you and me, it’s best to rely on internal meat temperature to determine when a brisket is properly cooked.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What most everyone does agree on is that a properly cooked slice of brisket should pull apart easily, while still maintaining good texture. Technically the meat is done at 160°F but continue on for more tender meat. An overcooked slice will fall apart when picked up. 188°F and 190°F seem to be the most popular target temps. When I barbecue a brisket entirely I cook to an internal temp of 185-190°F. In this temperature range, the flat will be fork-tender and the slices cut from the flat will hold together. Remember Slow and Low is the trick.

 

My Favorite Brisket recipe

My Favorite Brisket recipe

Funny story we originally had planned on a candied brisket and went shopping on Friday night instead of our usual Saturday morning. Wholefoods was very crowed at the meat counter and I forgot to get the brisket so we looped back to the crowed counter and without thinking purely out of habit asked for a single cut brisket instead of a corned beef. To top it off it was kids night and I had to fight for the samples.

So what does one do when they get home, adapt. When it was all said and done we voted that my original Jewish style recipe was better it created thicker richer tasting gravy the meat absorbed more of this flavor. This had a soupier more wine tasting gravy which flavored the meat as such. Don’t get me wrong it was very good but could have used a little kick. Maybe more garlic and onions or some sweetness.

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 5-pound brisket of beef, shoulder roast of beef, chuck roast, or end of steak
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 3 onions, peeled and diced
  • 1 10-ounce can tomatoes
  • 2 cups red wine
  • 2 stalks celery with the leaves, chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 sprig fresh thyme
  • 1 sprig fresh rosemary
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley
  • 6 to 8 carrots, peeled and sliced on the diagonal
  • I added about of whole berry cranberry sauce.

How

  • Sprinkle the salt and pepper over the brisket and rub with the garlic. Sear the brisket in the oil and then place, fat side up, on top of the onions in a large casserole. Cover with the tomatoes, red wine, celery, bay leaf, thyme, and rosemary.
  • Cover and bake in a preheated 325-degree oven for about 3 hours, basting often with pan juices.
  • Add the parsley and carrots and bake, uncovered, for 30 minutes more or until the carrots are cooked. To test for doneness, stick a fork in the flat (thinner or leaner end of the brisket). When there is a light pull on the fork as it is removed from the meat, it is “fork tender.”
  • This dish is best prepared in advance and refrigerated so that the fat can be easily skimmed from the surface of the gravy. Trim off all the visible fat from the cold brisket. Then place the brisket, on what was the fat side down, on a cutting board. Look for the grain – that is, the muscle lines of the brisket – and with a sharp knife, cut across the grain.
  • When ready to serve, reheat the gravy.
  • Put the sliced brisket in a roasting pan. Pour the hot gravy on the meat, cover, and reheat in a preheated 350-degree oven for 45 minutes. Some people like to strain the gravy, but I prefer to keep the onions because they are so delicious.

From JEWISH COOKING IN AMERICA by Joan Nathan (Alfred A. Knopf, 2001)