Deck Box Kale our First Harvest

Deck Box Kale our First Harvest

Each year we try something  new  in our garden or deck beds. This year it was salad themed we planted three types of lettuce, Swiss chard and the standard herbs but we added Kale. Lyn loves Kale uses it all the time in salads, soups or just sautéed. Everything pick as needed for a fresh salad. When I bought the seedlings the owner’s wife was excited she said good choice it is hearty. I think she was happy because it was her choice to provide Kale this year and he did not want to.  Anyway here is some information on this hearty crop.

KAle 2

WebMD Archive

By Kathleen M. Zelman, MPH, RD, LD

WebMD Expert Column

Move over Popeye and make room for the “queen of greens,” kale. Gaining in popularity, kale is an amazing vegetable being recognized for its exceptional nutrient richness, health benefits, and delicious flavor.

Our First Harvest of Kale

Eating a variety of natural, unprocessed vegetables can do wonders for your health, but choosing super-nutritious kale on a regular basis may provide significant health benefits, including cancer protection and lowered cholesterol.

curly green kale and beets

Kale, also known as borecole, is one of the healthiest vegetables on the planet. A leafy green, kale is available in curly, ornamental, or dinosaur varieties. It belongs to the Brassica family that includes cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, collards, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts.

What makes kale so exceptional? Here is why it’s a superstar vegetable — and ways to work it into your diet.

Kale is a Nutritional Powerhouse

One cup of chopped kale contains 33 calories and 9% of the daily value of calcium, 206% of vitamin A, 134% of vitamin C, and a whopping 684% of vitamin K. It is also a good source of minerals copper, potassium, iron, manganese, and phosphorus.

Kale’s health benefits are primarily linked to the high concentration and excellent source of antioxidant vitamins A, C, and K — and sulphur-containing phytonutrients.

Carotenoids and flavonoids are the specific types of antioxidants associated with many of the anti-cancer health benefits. Kale is also rich in the eye-health promoting lutein and zeaxanthin compounds.

Beyond antioxidants, the fiber content of cruciferous kale binds bile acids and helps lower blood cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease, especially when kale is cooked instead of raw.

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Salad with Strawberry, Pineapple and Avocado

Salad with Strawberry, Pineapple and Avocado

Salad with Strawberry, Pineapple and Avocado

So its lunch time and every day I bring a salad for lunch. Usually on Sundays make one huge base salad and store in a container that you can give CPR to the top and it pushes the air out of it.freshvac

I don’t put in things like cucumbers or other things that tend to spoil quickly just the base salad. Then in the morning I grab a bunch put it in my container and add my condiments if you will. saladshakerThe condiments are things cukes, tomato, whatever I had left over from dinner last night.  My handy little container has a compartment for dressing which for me is just plain ole 18 year old balsamic vinegar.

 

Ingredients

  • Base salad
  • Organic Strawberries cut in chunks
  • Fresh pineapple cut into chunks
  • ½ avocado slices
  • Cumber cut into chunks
  • Cherry tomatoes
  •  18 year old Balsamic Vinegar (you could add oil but why dilute the vinegar.)

 

How

Place all in your handy take to work container along with an orange and banana maybe some celery or carrot sticks.

Release vinegar, shake or toss and eat!

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Related articles

4 Healthy Reasons to Eat a Salad Today

By Elaine Magee, MPH, RD

WebMD Feature

 

Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Have you had your salad today? Eating salad almost every day may be one of the most healthy eating habits you can adopt — and one of the simplest, experts say.

 

Eating salads is a super-convenient way to work in a couple of servings of vegetables and/or fruit. Green salads are on the menu of almost every restaurant. You can even buy a side salad (with Romaine lettuce, carrots and tomatoes, available with fat-free or reduced-calorie salad dressing) for a buck at many fast food chains these days. And you can make a green salad at home in 5 minutes, armed with a bag of pre-washed salad greens, a few carrots or other veggies, and a bottle of light salad dressing.

 

Not only that, but salads are cool, crunchy, and fun to eat (lots of textures, colors, and flavors). Most people enjoy eating salads–even kids! You can customize them to include the fruits and vegetables that appeal to you the most, and whichever ones you have on hand.

 

Here are four health reasons to reach for a salad today:

 

1. Eat Salads for the Fiber

It’s hard to believe that something we can’t even digest can be so good for us! Eating a high-fiber diet can help lower cholesterol levels and prevent constipation.

Read more…

Not only that, says Barbara Rolls, PhD, author of The Volumetrics Eating Plan, eating more fiber can help you feel fuller, eat less, and ultimately lose weight.

 avacoda about

Avocado Health Benefits: The World’s Most Perfect Food?

It has achieved this distinction because many nutritionists claim it not only contains everything a person needs to survive — but it has also been found to contribute to the prevention and control of Alzheimer’s, cancer, heart disease, diabetes and other health conditions.

The avocado (Persea gratissima or P. americana) originated in Puebla, Mexico and its earliest use dates back to 10,000 years B.C. Since AD 900, the avocado tree has been cultivated and grown in Central and South America. In the 19th century, the avocado made its entry into California, and has since become a very successful commercial crop. Ninety-five percent (95%) of U.S. avocados are gown in Southern California.

The avocado, also called the alligator pear, is a high-fiber, sodium- and cholesterol-free food that provides nearly 20 essential nutrients, including fiber, is rich in healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (such as omega-3 fatty acids), vitamins A, C, D, E, K and the B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12 and folate) — as well as potassium.

Read more here

Carrot Orange Juice Chicken Noodle Soup

Carrot Orange Juice Chicken Noodle Soup

We were sitting on the couch being our regular weekend couch potatoes when Lyn with outstretched arms asked me can you make this or something like it and passed me the better homes and gardens magazine. She loves carrot juice and for a while was concerned her skin was going to turn orange she was drinking so much. I can just picture her looking like the “Tangerine Man” John Boehner walking into work with that lovely skin shade of orange. Anyway she did not turn orange and is still drinking it. I was never a fan although I can’t say that I really gave it a chance. So with my non love of carrot juice and being an ever supportive husband I said sure if you want.

The carrots in this came out so sweet the spice was just right if you like spicy and I got to say I really like this quick and easy soup.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 small onion, finely chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 ½ teaspoons curry powder

4 cups refrigerated orange-carrot juice – you can buy this or we used 3 cups carrot and 1 cup orange, Lyn is a Carrot Juice head.

1 14 ½ ounce can reduced-sodium chicken broth

½ teaspoon salt (I left out the Salt)

1 cup carrots, diagonally sliced

1 cup sliced celery

2 cups dried medium noodles (2 cups) –

1 cup sugar snap peas, trimmed (I used regular frozen peas)

2 tablespoons fresh cilantro leaves

¼ – ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper

2 cups shredded cooked chicken

Ingredients

How:

1. In a 4- to 5- quart Dutch oven heat olive oil over medium heat. Add onion and garlic; cook and stir 2 minutes. Add curry powder; cook 1 minute more. Carefully stir in orange-carrot juice, chicken broth, 1 cup water, and salt; add carrot and celery. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, 20 minutes.

Bring to boil and simmer

2. Add noodles; cook 6 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add chicken and sugar snap peas; heat through. Stir in cilantro and crushed red pepper. Where I used frozen peas I did not defrost them just added they were cooked perfectly.

Note: If you are going to serve the whole batch then add all the noodles but I always found they can end up absorbing too much of the soup if they sit in there so I cooked separately and added to the bowls when served. You will find if cooked in soup they will absorb more of the spice flavors.

 

Momma Bowl

Momma Bowl

Papa bowl

Papa bowl

 

 

 

 

What are the Health Benefits of Drinking Carrot Juice?

From WiseGeek.com

English: Glass of juice and carrots Français :...

 

Many people consider drinking carrot juice one of the healthiest lifestyle choices possible. Carrot juice is known for beta carotene which gives the body Vitamin A, B Vitamins, Vitamin E and many minerals. The health benefits of drinking carrot juice are thought to be good prenatal health, eyesight, bones and teeth, liver and nails, skin and hair as well as helping in cancer prevention.

 

Carrot juice is thought to reduce the risks of many different types of cancer including skin and breast cancer. The cancer-fighting properties of carrot juice are often thought to be excellent due to the high amounts of beta carotene. Beta carotene changes to Vitamin A in the body. Studies have connected Vitamin A with cancer prevention by its antioxidant properties that help eliminate cancer-causing free radicals in the body.

 

Deficiencies in Vitamin A can cause dryness and damage to the skin, nails and hair. Drinking carrot juice to produce Vitamin A is said to benefit many different parts of the body. Vitamin A also strengthens bones and teeth.

 

Drinking carrot juice is thought to be extremely beneficial for the liver due to Vitamin A’s cleansing effects. Vitamin A reduces bile and fat in the liver. However, for the liver to reap the maximum benefits of Vitamin A, it is said that drinking carrot juice needs be done regularly rather than occasionally. The liver can store Vitamin A.

 

Drinking carrot juice is also thought to improve eyesight due to Vitamin A creation in the body. Deficiencies in Vitamin A can lead to night blindness which can be very dangerous. For example, if a person with night blindness is driving a car at night, the glare of the headlights from oncoming cars in the opposite direction can affect him or her in a way that makes the eyes not refocus properly. An easy way of detecting a Vitamin A deficiency is to walk from a well-lit room to a dimly-lit or dark room. Your eyes should have little trouble adjusting to the change in light.

 

Drinking carrot juice, as well as eating carrots, is thought to be especially beneficial for prenatal health. Beta-carotene that forms into Vitamin A is said to be very healthy for both mother and child. Some studies have shown that when babies drink both milk and carrot juice they get the best possible amount of Vitamin A.

 

The darker the color of the carrot, the more carotene it contains. Many people find the taste of carrot juice enjoyable and surprisingly sweet. Carrot juice does have a high concentration of natural sugar, so those with diabetes should consult their doctor as to how much they can drink. Drinking carrot juice is also thought to be good for reproductive health due to the Vitamin E content.

Reality check

Reality check

I am trying to see how I am doing, so far just a few comments not that I expected hundreds this early on or ever, and I am just overwhelmed that I have 67 followers between Facebook and my blog I could not imagine when I began that anyone would be interested in what I cook or write about.

I am learning things everyday about writing recipes, taking pictures, cropping pictures the list goes on….

I need your help.

What I am looking for is how am I doing, any suggestions, what might you like to see, what improvements would you suggests, what should I stop doing? I have so many recipes that I don’t prepare any more but they were/are good, should I share those? I could go on but I won’t….

I am asking is that if possible, would you could you make the comments on the blog site not Facebook, I know it’s an extra click and wait but hey it’s for a friend right. Use the comment section at bottom of recipe and let me know what you think. Exchange ideas to try. Rate the dish if you tried it, there is the “Rate this” section below the Title then others might think to try.

But most importantly I encourage you to enjoy cooking and eating and watching for that smile on someone’s face when they take the first bite and shake their head.

Thanks so much!